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What is a Carpenter?

poster-carpenter-largeWhat Is A Carpenter?
Look around you. Carpenters are responsible at least in part, for creating just about every building in your community. Homes, schools, malls and office buildings are built from scratch through the skills and experience of professional carpenters. To be a carpenter is to be a member of one of the oldest and most respected trades in the world. If you enjoy working with tools,  like to see your work produce immediately results and if you have a good work ethic, you can build a lifetime career in carpentry.


What Types of Jobs Are Done by Carpenters?
Carpenters measure, saw, level and nail woods and other building materials. They install tile and insulation, acoustical ceilings, cabinets, siding, and much more. They work with many tools and materials to build houses, schools, churches and hotels. They erect skyscrapers, hospitals, office buildings, and prisons, and construct bridges, tunnels and highways. Carpenters make up the largest single group of skilled workers in the country.


What Type of Hours and Working Conditions Are Involved?
A typical carpenter s workday lasts eight hours, starting on the job site before daybreak. Much of the work is outdoors, but modern construction methods have erased the problems of extreme heat or freezing temperatures. Attention to safety and health is stressed all the time, because of the machinery, tools, materials and equipment used in this trade. Carpenters wear a hard hat, durable work clothes and safety shoes. Carpenters are usually paid by the hour and as union members they get time-and-a half or double time for all work over eight hours. Apprentices often start out on a job by helping to build concrete forms, cutting sheets of drywall and performing other beginning tasks. As they gain experience, they move into more complicated jobs.


How Do I Become a Professional Carpenter?
It's great to be in this industry, but to get there, you have to work hard. Your training will be done by local experts through an "apprenticeship" program. To make sure your training is the best in the country, a group of experienced contractors and union representatives make sure you get the right instruction and earn a good wage at the same time. To start, call your local carpenters union office to get more information. Ask them how to become an "Apprentice" in the carpentry program.


Does My High School Course Work Matter?
You can get a head start on becoming a carpenter by studying math and enrolling in shop work in your school. Classes in industrial arts and mechanical drawing will help you decide whether or not you have an interest in this trade.


What Is an Apprentice?
An apprentice is someone who is in the process of becoming a skilled carpenter through training and experience. Apprentices are earning a good income and learning a trade, all at once. Apprentices study both in the classroom and on the job under the guidance of skilled workers of that trade, called journeyman. From the first day of your apprenticeship, you are paid a wage and start to earn benefits. You also get regular raises, usually every six months, until you reach the full journeyman scale at the end of the apprenticeship program. In most cases the length of your apprenticeship is four years, and your training is free.


What Makes This Opportunity So Special?
The rewards of apprenticeship training are the good wages and benefits you receive as a skilled craftsperson. Union carpenters belong to the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and benefit from the security of being professional tradesmen. You will be working for a union contractor under the protection of a union contract, which means you will probably have some form of health insurance and pension and welfare benefits. It pays to be the best you can be: an apprentice-trained professional carpenter.


Professional carpenters are members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a proud organization with more than 500,000 members.

 

What is a Millwright?

poster-millwright-largeWhat Is a Millwright?
If you like to work with machines and tools and precision instruments, and have a keen eye for the perfect fit, you might consider being a millwright. Millwrights sometimes work to specifications requiring tolerances to a thousandth of an inch. Millwrights are an elite group of construction workers who work primarily in metal and with machinery and equipment requiring precision.

What Types of Jobs Are Done by Millwrights?
Millwrights install, maintain, diagnose and repair the machines that keep America running. These machines can be compressors, pumps, conveyors, monorails, extruders, gas and steam turbines, and mining equipment. Eery industry requires millwrights, such as pharmaceutical companies, steel mill refineries, auto plants, nuclear plants, mines and food processing facilities. Millwrights work inside and outside of facilities using hand and power tools, rigging and hoisting equipment, torches and welders, lasers, optical transits and precision measuring tools.


What Are the hours and Working Conditions of a Millwright?
Although millwrights work indoors much of the time, their duties also involve working on the outside of buildings and other structures, in situations often requiring the use of scaffolding. Millwrights work with a variety of hand and portable power tools, and frequently cut, join and fasten metal construction materials using welding equipment and oxy-acetylene torches. Generally, millwrights work eight-hour shifts. But, machinery breakdowns can happen unexpectedly and may require a millwright to travel long distances that include working overtime or split shifts. Working night shifts or overtime entitles the millwright to extra pay. A millwright has to be prepared to work in any condition, since the job could be inside or outside, clean or dirty, wet or dry, hot or cold. No matter what the conditions, millwrights pride themselves in getting the job done right and on time. Millwright apprentices usually start by helping journeymen with basic tasks like material handling and work into more sophisticated jobs as their skills and knowledge increase.


How Do I Become a Millwright?
It's great to be in this industry, but to get there, you have to work hard. Your training will be done by local experts through an apprenticeship program. To make sure your training is the best in the country, a group of experienced contractors and union representatives make sure you get the right instruction and earn a good wage at the same time. To start, call your local carpenters union office to get more information. Ask them how to become an Apprentice in the millwright program.


Does My High School Coursework Matter?
If you are still in school, you should take classes in mathematics, drafting or mechanical drawing, metal or industrial shop, or any construction courses which familiarize you with construction technology. These classes will help you develop the dexterity and practical thinking skills you will need as a millwright apprentice.


What Is an Apprentice?
Apprentices are earning a good income and learning a trade, all at once. Apprentices study both in the classroom and on the job under the guidance of skilled workers of that trade, call journeyman. From the first day of your apprenticeship, you are paid a wage and start to earn benefits. You also get regular raises for doing a good job usually every six months, until you reach the full journeyman scale at the end of the apprenticeship program. In most cases the length of your apprenticeship is four years, and your training is free.


What Makes This Opportunity So Special?
The rewards of apprenticeship training are the good wages and benefits you receive as a skilled craftsperson. Union millwrights belong to the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and benefit from the security of being professional tradesmen. You will be working for a union contractor under the protection of a union contract, which means that you will probably have some form of health insurance and pension and welfare benefits. It pays to be the best you can be: an apprentice-trained professional millwright.


Professional millwrights are members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a proud organization with more than 500,000 members.

 

What is a Pile Driver?

poster-piledriver-largeWhat Is a Pile Driver?
The name says it all. Professional pile drivers expertly and efficiently maneuver huge construction machinery to drive metal, concrete or wood piling into the earth during the early stages of construction. If you like working outside with large equipment, heavy materials and sometimes under extreme weather conditions then you' ll like the hearty occupation of the pile driver!


What Types of Jobs Are Completed by Pile Drivers?
Pile drivers install piling to hold back the Earth during excavations, or to set up the foundation of skyscrapers and bridges, or to build docks and wharfs. Due to the wide range of work performed in this field, many are certified welders and capable of working with a variety of sizes and shapes of steel. Some pile drivers are commercial divers, doing the underwater construction required by the pile driving industry.

 

What Are the Hours and Working Conditions of Pile Drivers?
Pile drivers usually work eight-hour days, and are typically the first workers at the construction site. Sometimes, projects like bridges, highways and overpasses require pile drivers to work nights and weekends, and to travel long distances. When that happens, pile drivers are compensated with shift pay and travel allowances. Hard hats, gloves, eye protection and steel-toed boots are worn for protection and safety measures. Pile drivers work with a variety of hand and portable power tools, and frequently cut, join and fasten metal construction materials using welding equipment and oxy-acetylene torches. Apprentices usually start out helping journeymen with the basic tasks like material handling, and move into more sophisticated jobs as their knowledge and skills increase.


How Do I Become a Pile Driver?
It's great to be in this industry, but to get there, you have to work hard. Your training will be done by local experts through an "apprenticeship" program. To make sure your training is the best in the country, a group of experienced contractors and union representatives make sure you get the right instruction and earn a good wage at the same time. To start, call your local carpenters union office to get more information. Ask them how to become an "Apprentice" in the pile driver program.


Does My High School Coursework Matter?
If you are still in school, you should take classes in mathematics, drafting or mechanical drawing, metal or industrial shop, or any construction courses which familiarize you with construction technology. These classes will help you develop the dexterity and practical thinking skills you will need as a piledriver apprentice.


What Is an Apprentice?
Apprentices earn a good income and learn a trade, all at once. Apprentices study both in the classroom and on-the-job under the guidance of skilled UBC members of that trade, called journeymen. From the first day of your apprenticeship, you are paid a wage and start to earn benefits. You also get raises for doing a good job, usually every six months, until you reach the full journeyman scale at the end of the apprenticeship. In most cases the length of your apprenticeship is four years, and your training Is free.

 

What Makes This Opportunity So Special?
The rewards of apprenticeship training are the good wages and benefits you receive as a skilled craftsperson. Union pile drivers belong to the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and benefit from the security of being professional tradesmen. You will be working for a union contractor under the protection of a union contract, which means that you will probably have some form of health insurance and pension and welfare benefits. It pays to be the best you can be: an apprentice-trained professional pile driver.


Professional pile drivers are members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a proud organization with more than 500,000 members.

 

What is an Interior Systems Carpenter?

What Is an Interior Systems Carpenter?
 Look around you. Just about every building in your community from your high school to the mall to the restaurant or dentist's office - was at least partially built by skilled carpenters. This is an expanding industry offering challenges to those entering the construction trades. It involves the installation of all sorts of modern equipment and material in commercial buildings, such as acoustical ceilings, raised floors for computers, metal framing, wall partitions and office furniture systems.


What Types of Jobs Are Done by Interior Systems Carpenters?
These specialized workers install construction materials and a variety of factory-produced systems in commercial buildings and public structures. Their specialized skills are brought into play as they assemble complex interior systems using technical data supplied by manufacturers. Saws and hammers as well as mechanic s tools such as drills, wrenches, and screwdrivers are used most often. Welding skills are also needed for assembly work.


What Types of Hours and Working Conditions Are Involved?
Interior systems carpenters generally work eight-hour days, often starting about 7am. Many of the installations erected by interior systems carpenters come carefully marked and crated, and journeymen and apprentices alike must carefully read instructions and specifications. As the title indicates, it s inside work. Sometimes it s at floor level and sometimes it s above the floor on scaffolds. Sturdy work clothes are worn, and, when necessary, special safety goggles and other gear are worn.


How Do I Become an Interior Systems Carpenter?
It's great to be in this industry, but to get there, you have to work hard. Your training will be done by local experts through an apprenticeship program. To make sure your training is the best in the country, a group of experienced contractors and union representatives make sure you get the right instruction and earn a good wage at the same time. To start, call your local carpenters union office to get more information. Ask them how to become an Apprentice in the interior systems program.


Does My High School Coursework Matter?
You can get a head start in becoming an interior systems carpenter by studying math and enrolling in shop work in school. Classes in industrial arts and mechanical drawing will help you decide whether or not you have an interest in this trade.


What Is an Apprentice?
Apprentices are earning a good income and learning a trade, all at once. Apprentices study both in the classroom and on the job under the guidance of skilled workers of that trade, call journeyman. From the first day of your apprenticeship, you are paid a wage and start to earn benefits. You also get regular raises for doing a good job usually every six months, until you reach the full journeyman scale at the end of the apprenticeship program. In most cases the length of your apprenticeship is four years, and your training is free.


What Makes This Opportunity So Special?
The rewards of apprenticeship training are the good wages and benefits you receive as a skilled craftsperson. Union interior systems carpenters belong to the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and benefit from the security of being professional tradesmen. You will be working in a good job under the protection of a union contract, which means that you will probably have some form of health insurance and pension and welfare benefits. It pays to be the best you can be: an apprentice-trained interior systems carpenter.

Interior systems ccarpenters are members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a proud organization with more than 500,000 members.

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